Christopher Taylor Bird Nature Wildlife Mammal Photography
nature photography
GALLERIES > BIRDS > PASSERIFORMES > PTILOGONATIDAE > PHAINOPEPLA [Phainopepla nitens]


Phainopepla Picture @ Kiwifoto.com
 
 
Location: Superior, AZ (Boyce Thompson Arboretum)
GPS: 33.3N, -111.2W, elev=2,373' MAP
Date: November 29, 2009
ID : 7C2V4876 [3888 x 2592]

Phainopepla Image @ Kiwifoto.com
 
 
Location: Patagonia, AZ
GPS: 31.5N, -110.8W, elev=4,047' MAP
Date: June 4, 2007
ID : ? [3888 x 2592]

nature photography

Phainopepla Picture @ Kiwifoto.com
 
 
Location: Patagonia, AZ
GPS: 31.5N, -110.8W, elev=4,047' MAP
Date: June 4, 2007
ID : ? [3888 x 2592]

Phainopepla Picture @ Kiwifoto.com
 
 
Location: Patagonia, AZ
GPS: 31.5N, -110.8W, elev=4,047' MAP
Date: November 14, 2009
ID : 7C2V4718 [3888 x 2592]

bird photography

SPECIES INFO

The Phainopepla (Phainopepla nitens) is the most northerly representative of the mainly tropical Central American family Ptilogonatidae, the silky flycatchers.

The Phainopepla is a striking bird, 16-20 cm long with a noticeable crest and a long tail; it is slender, and has an upright posture when it perches. Its bill is short and slender. The male is glossy black, and has a white wing patch that is visible when it flies; the female is plain gray and has a lighter gray wing patch. Both sexes have red eyes, but these are more noticeable in the female than the male.

The Phainopepla ranges as far north as central California and southern Utah, and south to northern Mexico. It is found in hot areas, including desert oases, and is readily seen in the deserts of Arizona and southern California.

Its chief food is the berries of the Desert Mistletoe (Phoradendron californicum), but since these are only available seasonally in the northern parts of its range, it also eats the berries of other trees such as juniper and elderberry, and insects, hawking for them in flight like a flycatcher. It is an important vector for the mistletoe seeds. When there enough mistletoe berries they will often congregate in the hundreds.

It nests in the spring. The eggs are dray or pink and speckled, and the incubation, done by both the male and female, takes fifteen days. The children will be reared by the parents for up to nineteen more days.

Phainopeplas have been found to imitate the calls of twelve other species, such as the Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo lineatus), and the Northern Flicker (Colaptes auratus).



                                     




bird photography
phainopepla's Range Map Click here to see the Phainopepla's range map!
Listen to the Phainopepla Song:



HOME · ABOUT ME · GALLERY · STOCKLIST · VIDEO · SEARCH · PRESS · CONTACT · BLOG · NEW STUFF
bird photography
All images and video © Copyright 2006-2016 Christopher Taylor, Content and maps by their respective owner. All rights reserved.
nature photography