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GALLERIES > BIRDS > CHARADRIIFORMES > SCOLOPACIDAE > UPLAND SANDPIPER [Bartramia longicauda]


Upland Sandpiper Image @ Kiwifoto.com
 
 
Location: Bell Fourche, SD (Camp Crook Road)
GPS: 45.1N, -103.9W, elev=3,306' MAP
Date: July 20, 2010
ID : 7C2V0875 [3888 x 2592]

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SPECIES INFO

The Upland Sandpiper, Bartramia longicauda, is a large shorebird, closely related to the curlews (Thomas, 2004). Older names are the Upland Plover and Bartram's Sandpiper. It is the only member of the genus Bartramia. The genus name and the old common name Bartram's Sandpiper commemorate the American naturalist William Bartram. The name "Bartram's Sandpiper" was made popular by Alexander Wilson, who was taught ornithology and natural history illustration by Bartram.

Description

The adult is 28-32 cm long with a 50-55 cm wingspan. It has long yellow legs and a long neck and tail. The head and neck are light with brown streaks. The back and upper wings are a darker mottled brown and the belly is white.

Distribution and habitat

The breeding habitat is open grasslands and fields across central North America and Alaska, it is not associated with water like other sandpipers. It is a long distance migrant and winters in South America. It is a very rare vagrant to Europe, notably the Isles of Scilly, where it can be extremely tame, with at least one bird taking worms from a birder's mouth.

Behaviour

Upland Sandpipers forage in fields, picking up food by sight. They are frequently sighted on fence posts or even telephone poles.

Breeding

Upland Sandpipers can sometimes be found in small loose nesting colonies. The breeding season is from early to late summer; nests are located on the ground in dense grass. The female lays 4 eggs; both parents look after the young and may perform distraction displays to lure predators away from the nest or young birds.

Food

They mainly eat insects and some vegetation.

Call

They can be identified by their very distinctive call which sounds like a series of descending whistles.

Conservation

The numbers of these birds increased as forests were cleared in the early 19th century, but declined sharply in the late 1800s due to hunting. They are now fairly common in Midwestern North America but populations are scattered in the east.





                                     




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upland_sandpiper's Range Map Click here to see the Upland Sandpiper's range map!
Listen to the Upland Sandpiper Song:



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