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GALLERIES > BIRDS > CICONIIFORMES > CICONIIDAE > WOOD STORK [Mycteria americana]


Wood Stork Picture @ Kiwifoto.com
 
 
Location: Salton Sea, CA
GPS: 33.2N, -115.6W, elev=-232' MAP
Date: August 20, 2010
ID : 7C2V1832 [3888 x 2592]

nature photography

Wood Stork Photo @ Kiwifoto.com
 
 
Location: Salton Sea, CA
GPS: 33.2N, -115.6W, elev=-232' MAP
Date: August 20, 2010
ID : 7C2V1965 [3888 x 2592]

nature photography

Wood Stork Photo @ Kiwifoto.com
 
 
Location: Salton Sea, CA
GPS: 33.2N, -115.6W, elev=-232' MAP
Date: August 20, 2010
ID : 7C2V1975 [3888 x 2592]

bird photography

Wood Stork Image @ Kiwifoto.com
 
 
Location: Salton Sea, CA
GPS: 33.2N, -115.6W, elev=-232' MAP
Date: August 20, 2010
ID : 7C2V1969 [3888 x 2592]

bird photography

Wood Stork Picture @ Kiwifoto.com
 
 
Location: Salton Sea, CA
GPS: 33.2N, -115.6W, elev=-232' MAP
Date: August 20, 2010
ID : 7C2V1842 [3888 x 2592]

nature photography

Wood Stork Photo @ Kiwifoto.com
 
 
Location: Salton Sea, CA
GPS: 33.2N, -115.6W, elev=-232' MAP
Date: August 20, 2010
ID : 7C2V1905 [3888 x 2592]

nature photography

Wood Stork Picture @ Kiwifoto.com
 
 
Location: The Everglades, FL
GPS: 25.3N, -80.9W, elev=0' MAP
Date: April 15, 2010
ID : 7C2V6896 [3888 x 2592]

Wood Stork (juvenile)
 
 
Location: Salton Sea, CA
GPS: 33.2N, -115.6W, elev=-227' MAP
Date: August 15, 2009
ID : 7C2V1930 [3888 x 2592]

bird photography

Wood Stork (juvenile)
 
 
Location: Salton Sea, CA
GPS: 33.2N, -115.6W, elev=-227' MAP
Date: August 15, 2009
ID : 7C2V1794 [3888 x 2592]

Wood Stork (juvenile)
 
 
Location: Salton Sea, CA
GPS: 33.2N, -115.6W, elev=-227' MAP
Date: August 15, 2009
ID : 7C2V1889 [3888 x 2592]

nature photography

Wood Stork (juvenile)
 
 
Location: Salton Sea, CA
GPS: 33.2N, -115.6W, elev=-227' MAP
Date: August 15, 2009
ID : 7C2V1919 [3888 x 2592]

Wood Stork (juvenile)
 
 
Location: Salton Sea, CA
GPS: 33.2N, -115.6W, elev=-227' MAP
Date: August 15, 2009
ID : 7C2V1660 [3888 x 2592]

nature photography

Wood Stork (juvenile)
 
 
Location: Salton Sea, CA
GPS: 33.2N, -115.6W, elev=-227' MAP
Date: August 15, 2009
ID : 7C2V1885 [3888 x 2592]

Wood Stork (juvenile)
 
 
Location: Salton Sea, CA
GPS: 33.2N, -115.6W, elev=-227' MAP
Date: August 15, 2009
ID : 7C2V1915 [3888 x 2592]

nature photography

Wood Stork (juvenile)
 
 
Location: Salton Sea, CA
GPS: 33.2N, -115.6W, elev=-227' MAP
Date: August 15, 2009
ID : 7C2V1930 [3888 x 2592]

Wood Stork (juvenile)
 
 
Location: Salton Sea, CA
GPS: 33.2N, -115.6W, elev=-227' MAP
Date: August 15, 2009
ID : 7C2V1887 [3888 x 2592]

bird photography

Wood Stork Image @ Kiwifoto.com
 
 
Location: Anahuac Wildlife Refuge, TX
GPS: 29.5N, -94.5W, elev=3' MAP
Date: August 31, 2009
ID : 7C2V3749 [3888 x 2592]

nature photography

SPECIES INFO

A Wood Stork feeding near a lagoon in Northeastern Florida. Facial detials of a wood stork.

The Wood Stork (Mycteria americana) is a large wading bird in the stork family Ciconiidae. It is a tropical species which breeds in much of South America, Central America and the Caribbean. The Wood Stork is the only stork that presently breeds in North America; there is a small and endangered breeding population in Florida, Georgia, and South Carolina, along with a recently discovered rookery in southeastern North Carolina United States. The Wood Stork was formerly called the Wood Ibis, though it is not really an ibis.

The adult is a large bird typically 1 m tall with a 1.5 m wingspan and weighing 2.4 kg. It appears all white on the ground, with blackish-gray legs and pink feet. In flight, the trailing edge of the wings is black. The head is dark brown with a bald, black face, and the thick downcurved bill is dusky yellow. Juvenile birds are a duller version of the adult, generally browner on the neck, and with a paler bill.

The wood stork is a broad-winged soaring bird that flies with its neck outstretched and legs extended. It walks slowly and steadily in shallow water up to its belly in open wetlands seeking its prey, which, like that of most of its relatives, consists of fish, frogs and large insects. The wood stork forages for food usually where lowering water levels concentrate fish. They catch fish by holding their bill open in the water until a fish is detected.

It is a resident breeder in lowland wetlands with trees. The large stick nest is built in a forest tree. They breed once a year, and 3-5 eggs are laid in the typical clutch. The eggs are incubated 27-32 days by both sexes. Their reproductive cycle is triggered when waterholes dry up sufficiently to concentrate fish in sufficient numbers for efficient feeding of the chicks.

This species seems to have evolved in tropical regions; its North American presence probably postdates the last ice age. Older fossils from that continent are of an extinct larger relative, M. wetmorei. This was probably a sister species; both occurred sympatrically on Cuba at the end of the Pleistocene.





                                     




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wood_stork's Range Map Click here to see the Wood Stork's range map!
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